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PP🅐F

Rader

Räder
with Italics

Free to try
Licenses starting at $30

AaBbCc※123◌wR@ẞ&?®gti 
AaBbCc※123◌wR@ẞ&?®gti 
Infos

Designed to work both as an expressive display typeface and as a readable editorial tool, Räder's range spans across 16 carefully crafted weights: from a stripped down hairline cut to the more exuberant and decorative bold.

Road signage is something of which we've learned to assume the neutrality: it's ubiquitous, simple and sends an arguably unmistakable message to the viewer. Has it always be like that, though? ● Vintage signage systems were in fact the result of a graphic compromise between clarity of message and beauty of appearance, as designers understood the importance of wayfinding in the urban identity: Räder is an attempt to bring the craft back to such times. On one hand immediately recognisable, on the other oddly familiar, it draws from a debut-de-siecle aesthetic to spice up the hyperpopular genre of industrial grotesques.

▲ Räder's inner round counters give the feeling of a printed typeface, without compromising its modern look, so you can have the best of both worlds... or should we say the best of both ages?

Credits & details

Styles 16 Styles with 1,351 Glyphs each
Designer
Collaborator
Latest Update January 2022
Version 1.00
Available Formats OTF, TTF, WOFF, WOFF2

Supported languages

Afrikaans
Basque
Breton
Catalan
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Estonian
Finnish
French
Gaelic
German
Hungarian
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Latvian
Lituanian
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese
Romanian
Saami
Serbian
Slovak
Slovenian
Spanish
Swahili
Swedish
Turkish
(and more)
Styles
Aa
  • Hairline 160
    Thin 260
    Extralight 400
    Light 520
    Regular 630
    Medium 740
    Semibold 830
    Bold 900
  • Hairline Italic 160
    Thin Italic 260
    Extralight Italic 400
    Light Italic 520
    Regular Italic 630
    Medium Italic 740
    Semibold Italic 830
    Bold Italic 900
Gotta ♥ Variable Fonts.
Rader
is variable in
Weight + Italic!
Rader
is variable in
Weight + Italic!
Regular

German Autobahnen are widely known for having no federally mandated speed limit for some classes of vehicles. However, limits are posted (and enforced) in areas that are urbanised, substandard, accident-prone, or under construction. On speed-unrestricted stretches, an advisory speed limit (Richtgeschwindigkeit) of 130 kilometres per hour (81 mph) applies. While driving faster is not illegal as such in the absence of a speed limit, it can cause an increased liability in the case of a collision (which mandatory auto insurance has to cover); courts have ruled that an 'ideal driver' who is exempt from absolute liability for 'inevitable' tort under the law would not exceed Richtgeschwindigkeit. A 2017 report by the Federal Road Research Institute reported that in 2015 70.4% of the autobahn network had only the advisory speed limit, 6.2% had temporary speed limits due to weather or traffic conditions, and 23.4% had permanent speed limits. Measurements from the German state of Brandenburg in 2006 showed average speeds of 142 km/h (88 mph) on a 6-lane section of autobahn in free-flowing conditions. Only federally built controlled-access highways with certain construction standards including at least two lanes per direction are called Bundesautobahn. They have their own white-on-blue signs and numbering system. In the 1930s, when construction began on the system, the official name was Reichsautobahn. Various other controlled-access highways exist on the federal (Bundesstraße), state (Landesstraße), district, and municipal level but are not part of the Autobahn network and are officially referred to as Kraftfahrstraße (with rare exceptions, like A 995 Munich-Giesing–Brunntal until 2018).
        Nach dem National Trunk Highway System (über 149.600 km) der Volksrepublik China, dem Interstate Highway System (über 77.900 km) in den USA sowie dem Autobahnensystem in Spanien (17.228 km) ist das deutsche Autobahnnetz mit über 13.190 Kilometern (Stand 2020)[1] das viertlängste der Welt. Autobahnen in Deutschland sind in der Regel Bundesautobahnen (Abkürzung: BAB) nach dem Bundesfernstraßengesetz (FStrG); es können jedoch auch andere Straßen mit geeignetem Ausbauzustand als Autobahnen beschildert sein. Umgekehrt sind nicht alle Bundesautobahnen als Autobahn beschildert. Autobahnen im Sinne der Straßenverkehrsordnung werden durch das Verkehrszeichen 330 ( Zeichen 330 - Autobahn, StVO 1992.svg ) gekennzeichnet. Sie dürfen nur von Kraftfahrzeugen befahren werden, deren bauartbedingte Höchstgeschwindigkeit 60 km/h überschreitet (§ 18 Abs. 1 Satz 1 StVO). Die Autobahnen wurden bis zum 31. Dezember 2020 von den Bundesländern in Auftragsverwaltung des Bundes verwaltet. Seit dem 1. Januar 2021 werden die Autobahnen zentral vom Fernstraßen-Bundesamt und der Autobahn GmbH des Bundes verwaltet.

Hairline

The Autobahn is the federal controlled-access highway system in Germany. The official German term is Bundesautobahn (abbreviated BAB), which translates as “federal motorway”. The literal meaning of the word Bundesautobahn is “Federal Auto(mobile) Track”.

Characters
Basic Latin A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z ! # ( ) * - . / 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ; ? [ ] _ { } $ % + < = > ^ ~ @ & |
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Font in use

Here are some beautiful projects using our fonts ● You can go check out our Font in Use Section and don't forget to send us your projects using our fonts to get featured.

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