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Mori
with Italics

Free to try
Licenses starting at $30

AaBbCc123wR@ẞ&?®Mori 
AaBbCc123wR@ẞ&?®Mori 
Infos

Mori is a versatile and sophisticated gothic sans serif inspired by contemporary Japanese design, best suited for editorial, graphic design and branding.

▲ From ExtraLight to ExtraBold, it has 16 styles, each one includes 597 glyphs with plenty of open type features, including sets with circled and squared numbers, subscript and superscript numbers, symbols and punctuations (some of them Japanese), graphic and mathematical symbols and many alternates ● Make sure to check out that geometric 'r' and double-story 'g' !!

While keeping all the functionality of a workhorse Grotesk, Mori is far from being boring. You can find some unique and subtle shapes and curves that makes it stand out from the crowd. Notably it's G, number 6 and number 9 just to name a few ● But the predominant feature of Mori's personality takes place in its exagerated diacritics and punctuations. Their scarse presence makes this detail something to look forward to when designing with Mori.

Credits & details

Styles 16 Styles with 597 Glyphs each
Designer
Collaborators
Latest Update April 2022
Version 1.00
Available Formats OTF, TTF, WOFF, WOFF2

Supported languages

Afrikaans
Basque
Breton
Catalan
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Estonian
Finnish
French
Gaelic
German
Hungarian
Icelandic
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Latvian
Lituanian
Norwegian
Polish
Portuguese
Romanian
Saami
Serbian
Slovak
Slovenian
Spanish
Swahili
Swedish
Turkish
(and more)
Styles
Aa
  • ExtraLight 100
    Light 200
    Book 300
    Regular 400
    Medium 475
    SemiBold 600
    Bold 700
    ExtraBold 800
  • ExtraLight Italic 100
    Light Italic 200
    Book Italic 300
    Regular Italic 400
    Medium Italic 475
    SemiBold Italic 600
    Bold Italic 700
    ExtraBold Italic 800
Gotta ♥ Variable Fonts.
Mori
is variable in
Weight + Italic!
Mori
is variable in
Weight + Italic!
Regular

Mori Rintarō obtained his medical license at a very young age and introduced translated German language literary works to the Japanese public. Mori Ōgai also was considered the first to successfully express the art of western poetry in Japanese. He wrote many works and created many writing styles. The Wild Geese (1911–1913) is considered his major work. After his death, he was considered one of the leading writers who modernized Japanese literature. Although Mori did little writing from 1892 to 1902, he continued to edit a literary journal (Mezamashi gusa, 1892–1909). He also produced translations of the works of Goethe, Schiller, Ibsen, Hans Christian Andersen, and Hauptmann. It was during the Russo-Japanese War (1904–05) that Mori started keeping a poetic diary. After the war, he began holding tanka writing parties that included several noted poets such as Yosano Akiko. Mori Ōgai helped found a new magazine called Subaru (literary magazine) in 1909 with the help of others such as Yosano Akiko and Yosano Tekkan. His later works can be divided into three separate periods. From 1909 to 1912, he wrote mostly fiction based on his own experiences. This period includes Vita Sexualis, and his most popular novel, Gan (The Wild Geese, 1911–13), which is set in 1881 Tokyo and was filmed by Shirō Toyoda in 1953 as The Mistress. In 1909, he released his novel Vita Sexualis which was abruptly banned a month later. Authorities deemed his work too sexual and dangerous to public morals. Mori Ōgai, during the period he was writing Vita Sexualis, focused on making a statement regarding the current literary trends of modern Japanese literature. He approached the trend on sexuality and individualism by describing them as a link between body and soul. Ōgai points out problems concerning the art and literature world in the 19th century in his work. His writing style, depicted from the Meiji government's perspective, derived from naturalism and was implemented with his thoughts that were brought up from writers who focused on the truth. His later works link his concerns with the Ministry of Education regarding the understanding of 'intellectual freedom' and how they police and dictate the potential of literature. From 1912 to 1916, he wrote mostly historical stories. Deeply affected by the death of General Nogi Maresuke in 1912, he explored the impulses of self-destruction, self-sacrifice and patriotic sentiment. This period includes Sanshō Dayū, and Takasebune. From 1916 to 1921, he turned his attention to biographies of three Edo period doctors.

ExtraLight

Lieutenant-General Mori Rintarō (February 17, 1862 – July 8, 1922), known by his pen name Mori Ōgai, was a Japanese Army Surgeon general officer, translator, novelist, poet and father of famed author Mari Mori.

Mori est devenu l’éditeur japonais adjoint de The New Canadian à la fin des années 1940. A sa retraite en 1983, il était devenu rédacteur en chef du journal. Mori était un membre fondateur des associations de presse ethnique de l’Ontario et du Canada.

Characters
Basic Latin A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z ! # ( ) * - . / 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ; ? [ ] _ { } $ % + < = > ^ ~ @ & |
A
Font in use

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